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Viral Infections

Viral infections can cause a variety of rashes. Find out more about the skin conditions caused by viruses.
  1. Chicken Pox (12)
  2. Fifth Disease (3)
  3. Shingles (7)
  4. Smallpox (10)

Roseola
Roseola is a common viral infection that occurs in infants and children. The symptoms of roseola are distinct and striking, but are relatively benign. Learn more about this common infection.

Rubella
Rubella, or German measles, is a viral infection that most often occurs in the late winter and spring, but since a vaccine was developed in 1969, rubella infections have decreased dramatically. If a pregnant woman contracts a rubella infection, there is a chance it could cause birth defects in her baby. Find out more about what rubella looks like and how it's treated.

Chicken Pox Pictures
Chicken pox is a common infection caused by the varicella virus. This gallery shows pictures of chicken pox lesions in various stages and on different types of skin.

Shingles Pictures
Shingles is a painful rash that has some distinct characteristics. This photo gallery shows various shingles rashes on different people.

Measles Pictures
Measles, or rubeola, is a very contagious viral infection that starts out with symptoms similar to influenza. The measles rash can look like other viral rashes, but someone with measles gets Koplik spots which differentiates this rash from any other. Take a look at pictures of measles rashes and Koplik spots.

Measles
Measles is a very contagious viral infection that starts out with symptoms similar to influenza. In the United States the incidence has decreased by 99% since a vaccine was developed, but outbreaks do still occur. Learn more about what the rash looks like and how it's treated.

Shingles Vaccine on Backorder
Merck announced the shingles vaccine, Zostavax, is on backorder for 4-6 months. Find out more about what this means for you.

All About Shingles
Shingles is a painful rash caused by reactivation of the chicken pox virus - varicella zoster. Learn more about how shingles is contracted and what the rash looks like.

Severe Pain after Shingles Rash
Postherpetic neuralgia is a condition that causes severe, prolonged long pain after a shingles-related rash has subsided. Learn more about this sometimes debilitating condition and how it is treated and prevented.

Shingles Treatment
Shingles is a painful rash caused by reactivation of the chicken pox virus - varicella zoster. Learn more about the treatment options for shingles and its complications.

Fifth Disease
Fifth disease or slapped cheeks disease is a common childhood viral infection that causes red cheeks and a pink lacelike rash on a child's arms.

Molluscum Contagiosum
Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection that can be confused with warts. Find out more about this self-limited rash that generally affects children.

Pityriasis Rosea
Pityriasis rosea is a common, self-limited rash that can be very itchy. Find out more about the appearance and treatment of pityriasis rosea.

Viral Hemorrhagic Fever
Viral hemorrhagic fever refers to a group of illnesses caused by a distinct family of viruses. Examples of well-known VHF’s are Ebola Virus, Marburg Virus, Hanta Virus, and Dengue Fever. Find out more about this deadly group of diseases.

Roseola
Roseola is a common viral infection of early childhood and commonly causes a high fever which is followed by a rash once the fever breaks.

Hand Foot and Mouth Disease
This infection is highly contagious with lesions found primarily on the palms, soles, and in the mouth.

Pityriaisis Rosea
Pityriasis Rosea, or PR, is a very itchy rash that is caused by a virus. Find out more about this condition from Dermatology Channel.

Roseola Infantum
Find out more about this very common viral infection that occurs in children.

Coxsackie Virus Infections
Coxsackie viruses cause many different types of infections. This article from the American Academy of Pediatrics explains the symptoms of these infections.

Molluscum Contagiousum
This condition commonly seen in children is similar to warts. Find out more in this article from the American Academy of Dermatologists.

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