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Treatment of Acne Scars

Acne Scar Treatment Procedures

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Updated July 03, 2014

There are numerous procedures that can be used to correct acne scars. Each procedure has its own risks and benefits, and several procedures are normally combined to create the smoothest appearing skin. Here is a brief discussion of the more effective acne treatment procedures.

Dermal Fillers
There are many types of dermal fillers that can be injected into acne scars to raise the surface of the skin and give a smoother look. Examples of dermal fillers are fat, bovine collagen, human collagen, hyaluronic acid derivatives, and polytheyl-methacrylate microspheres with collagen. The injection of these materials does not permanently correct acne scars, so further injections are necessary.

Punch Excision
This method of surgically correcting acne scars is used on deep scars such as icepick and deep boxcar scars. This procedure uses a punch biopsy tool which is basically a round, sharp "cookie-cutter" tool that comes in diameters ranging from 1.5 mm to 3.5 mm. The size of the tool is matched to the size of the scar to include the walls of the scar. Under local anesthesia the scar is excised with the punch tool and the skin edges are sutured together. The newly produced scar eventually fades and may not be noticeable. If it is noticeable, it is more amenable now to resurfacing techniques.

Punch Excision with Skin Graft Replacement
With this method the scar is excised with the punch tool as above. Instead of suturing the skin edges together, the defect is filled with a punch skin graft usually taken from behind the ear. With this procedure a color and texture difference may be noticeable, but a skin resurfacing technique can be used 4-6 weeks after the grafting to correct this difference.

Punch Elevation
This method of surgically correcting acne scars is used on deep boxcar scars that have sharp edges and normal appearing bases. The same punch tool as above is used to excise the base of the scar leaving the walls of the scar intact. The excised base is then elevated to the surface of the skin and attached with sutures, steri-strips, or skin glue called Dermabond. This method lessens the risk of color or texture differences as can be seen with graft replacement, and lessens the risk of producing a visible scar as can be seen when wound edges are sutured.

Subcutaneous Incision
Subcutaneous incision, also known as Subcision, is used to break up the fibrous bands that cause rolling scars. Subcision is performed under local anesthesia by inserting a specially beveled needle under the skin so that it is parallel to the skin surface. Staying in the plane between the dermis and the subcutaneous tissue, the needle is gently advanced and retracted in a piston-like motion cutting the tethering bands. This procedure causes bruising which fades after about 1 week. The risks of subcision include bleeding and the formation of subcutaneous nodules. Bleeding can be controlled with proper use of anesthetics and bandaging, and the subcutaneous nodules can be treated with injection of corticosteroids into the nodule.

Laser Resurfacing
Laser resurfacing is a popular treatment for many skin defects. The most popular laser types used for resurfacing of acne scars are the carbon dioxide (CO2) and erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) lasers. Lasers work by essentially burning the top layers of skin to a precise depth. The skin then heals replacing the burned layers with newer appearing skin. The correct post-operative care of skin that has undergone laser resurfacing is a very important factor in determining the success of the procedure.

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